-->

Monday, September 08, 2014

Dine and Discuss at a Jasper County Farm




Tammy and Kendall Culp opened their farm to Jasper County officials. It was called a Dine and Discuss Event. Their gravel road lead us to their home and farm in the middle of corn and soybean fields. 

 


A homestead always quiet was now busy.  The Culp's started with a reception with samples of cheese from Fair Oaks Farms and wine from Carpenter Creek Cellars


After introductions from Kendall and Tammy Culp we were sent to three stations to learn more about their farming operation.



Ken Culp lll is Kendall's brother. Ken and his family live in Kentucky and Ken works for the University of Kentucky Cooperative Extension.  Ken and his family come back to the family farm in Jasper County when it is time to AI (Artificial Inseminate) their herd.  They use a synchronization program to get all the cows in their herd in heat at the same time.  This is a great tool for cattlemen to use w when they want their cows to calve.




Stu Manchester, Salesman for Channel Seed talked about corn and soybeans and agronomy.


  
This is a drone, right? In agriculture, let's call it a Quadcopter. The quad is used to scout crops, waterways, and maybe check on the cattle in the pasture.  It allows you to cover more area, in a faster amount of time. The battery has a life span of about 20 minutes, and flip a special switch on the transmitter, and it comes back to you, like a boomerang, landing close to the home place.

 
 What's the price of machinery today? What does it cost per acre to harvest in the fall? Let's pencil it all out. Notice, we saw red and green on the Culp Farm!



All the food served for dinner was grown in Jasper County. 





Dave and I really enjoyed visiting with our neighbors in Jasper County.  It is the third largest  county in the state and the leading agricultural producing county in the state with the market value of product sold at $293,544,000. We all join together when needed, and dine and discuss, especially when it is for the good of agriculture.


 

No comments: